JAPANESE FLOOR PILLOWS. JAPANESE FLOOR


JAPANESE FLOOR PILLOWS. SUNDAY GIRL FOUR FLOORS MP3.



Japanese Floor Pillows





japanese floor pillows






    floor pillows
  • Larger square and rectangular shaped pillows designed for lounging on the floor with while watching TV, napping, or just relaxing with a book. Popularity for these style cushions and pillows has grown rapidly with the in home theater trend in home entertainment.





    japanese
  • The language of Japan, spoken by almost all of its population

  • A native or national of Japan, or a person of Japanese descent

  • of or relating to or characteristic of Japan or its people or their culture or language; "the Japanese Emperor"; "Japanese cars"

  • a native or inhabitant of Japan

  • the language (usually considered to be Altaic) spoken by the Japanese











japanese floor pillows - A Japanese




A Japanese Interior Pattern


A Japanese Interior Pattern



This collection of traditional Japanese pieces can be tastefully incorporated into any decorating scheme. Pattern includes floor cushions (zabuton), sleeping pillows (makura), futon, futon cover, top quilt (kakebuton), decorative curtains (noren), and tips for adapting any kimono pattern (such as Folkwear #113) for a quilted sleeping kimono (yogi). Information about traditional handwork and dyeing techniques also included. Suggested fabrics: For the Cushions and Futon Covers, choose medium to heavyweight cottons, silks, or blends. For the Noren, choose light to medium-weight cottons, silks, or blends.










83% (13)





Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu




Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu





NUESTRA SENORA DE GUADALUPE DE CEBU
Patrona de la Ciudad y Provincia de Cebu

The origin of the Cebuano devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe; the origin and history of the image; and the religious practices and oral tradition that are associated with the Virgin of Guadalupe of Cebu.

That sometime in 1880, Ricardo Ramirez, a "Mangangayam" or wild chicken trapper who lived in the forested area of what was then Barrio Banawan (now Barangay Guadalupe), in the course of his trapping activities, one day saw a flashing light coming from inside the cave known as "langub nga duha'y baba" (cave with two mouths). It is near the river called Sapang Diyot of Barangay Kalunasan. Surprised by what he saw, Ramirez called the attention of the other trappers who were near him but when they looked, they could not see anything. Ricardo decided to investigate the source of the light inside the cave. He got inside and saw that the light flashes came from an estampita (Holy Card, usually measuring 2 inches by 3 inches) of Our Lady. The picture was standing atop a naturally formed rock, beside which a slow drip of water cascaded into a basin -shaped rock on the floor. The light and the flashing stopped when Ricardo got inside. He took the holy card and gave it to the teniente del barrio, Eustaquio Abapo, in turn showed the picture to the barrio's "mananabtan" (prayer group leader), Placido "Edo" Datan. Placido advised Eustaquio to keep the unusual find until they would know what to do with it.

Eustaquio Abapo hid the picture somewhere in his house as advised by Placido but soon forgot where, until some years later when Placido, Eustaquio, the barrio catechist Silverio Gonzales and other people in the area thought of building a chapel in Kalunasan, in the property of Eustaquio. This was sometime in 1889.

The four decided to ask permission of Fr. Ceferino Fernandez, parish priest of San Nicolas, who had jurisdiction over Banawan. When they arrived in San Nicolas convent office, they saw a two feet wooden image of Our Lady and they suddenly remembered the estampita given to them by Ricardo Ramirez years back because the image resembled the image in the holy card. Without telling the parish priest about their intention, the three hurried back to Banawan to look for the estampita in Eustaquio's house. They didn't find it then so; they decided to postpone telling the parish priest about their find and their plan until they have the holy card.

A few months later, the estampita was found by Eustaquio lying under a bundle of corn that was harvested from his field. The four immediately decided to go back to Fr. Fernandez and told the priest what Ricardo Ramirez found inside the cave, and what they were planning to do. When the priest saw the estampita, he told the group that it was the picture of Our Lady of Guadalupe. He asked for it and kept it. He gave his consent for the construction of a small chapel in honor of Our Lady of Guadalupe in kalunasan, and agreed to lend them the two-foot wooden image they saw in the convent on their yearly novena and fiesta from December 4 to 12. However, he also made them promise that the image should be returned to San Nicolas after the fiesta. According to the narration of Florencio "Noy Rencio" Tabal, who was already 96 years old when I talked to him sometime in 2002, the parishioners from Pasil resented the lending of the image to the Banawan chapel for the first fiesta celebration, and they would always try to prevent the procession from leaving San Nicolas by blocking the path but the people of Banawan, more numerous in number than them, persisted and always succeeded in bringing the image to the chapel in the mountain. During this time, the name of the barrio became Guadalupe because word got around that the Blessed Virgin of Guadalupe appeared in a cave in Banawan.

Although there was a story of a sighting by the late Josefa "Nang Sepa" Labra (d. 1948) of a young and beautiful girl who would play in what is now the church plaza which at that time was still full of fruit trees. According to Nang Seap, she would often check on her carrabaos tied in the trees along the plaza at dawn. Often, she would be disturbed by the sight of a young girl playing at dawn. So one day, she decided to spy on the girl, Nang Sepa wend inside the chapel to validate her suspicion that the girl could be no other that the Virgin of Guadalupe. She checked the image and saw amorseco weeds attached to the hemline of its dress, the kind that abounds in the plaza. In addition, the fragrance that accompanies the presence of the young girl when she shows herself to Nang Sepa at dawn also filled the chapel. From then on, word spread that the Blessed Virgin appears as a chubby little girl and plays around the plaza of the chapel at dawn.

From that first Fiesta in 1889 until 1901, Our lady of Guadalupe was just a local barrio devotion. Every year, the image was borrowed f











Miraculous Image of Our Lady of Guadalupe de Cebu




Miraculous Image of Our Lady of Guadalupe de Cebu





NUESTRA SENORA DE GUADALUPE DE CEBU
Patrona de la Ciudad y Provincia de Cebu

The origin of the Cebuano devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe; the origin and history of the image; and the religious practices and oral tradition that are associated with the Virgin of Guadalupe of Cebu.



That sometime in 1880, Ricardo Ramirez, a "Mangangayam" or wild chicken trapper who lived in the forested area of what was then Barrio Banawan (now Barangay Guadalupe), in the course of his trapping activities, one day saw a flashing light coming from inside the cave known as "langub nga duha'y baba" (cave with two mouths). It is near the river called Sapang Diyot of Barangay Kalunasan. Surprised by what he saw, Ramirez called the attention of the other trappers who were near him but when they looked, they could not see anything. Ricardo decided to investigate the source of the light inside the cave. He got inside and saw that the light flashes came from an estampita (Holy Card, usually measuring 2 inches by 3 inches) of Our Lady. The picture was standing atop a naturally formed rock, beside which a slow drip of water cascaded into a basin -shaped rock on the floor. The light and the flashing stopped when Ricardo got inside. He took the holy card and gave it to the teniente del barrio, Eustaquio Abapo, in turn showed the picture to the barrio's "mananabtan" (prayer group leader), Placido "Edo" Datan. Placido advised Eustaquio to keep the unusual find until they would know what to do with it.

Eustaquio Abapo hid the picture somewhere in his house as advised by Placido but soon forgot where, until some years later when Placido, Eustaquio, the barrio catechist Silverio Gonzales and other people in the area thought of building a chapel in Kalunasan, in the property of Eustaquio. This was sometime in 1889.

The four decided to ask permission of Fr. Ceferino Fernandez, parish priest of San Nicolas, who had jurisdiction over Banawan. When they arrived in San Nicolas convent office, they saw a two feet wooden image of Our Lady and they suddenly remembered the estampita given to them by Ricardo Ramirez years back because the image resembled the image in the holy card. Without telling the parish priest about their intention, the three hurried back to Banawan to look for the estampita in Eustaquio's house. They didn't find it then so; they decided to postpone telling the parish priest about their find and their plan until they have the holy card.

A few months later, the estampita was found by Eustaquio lying under a bundle of corn that was harvested from his field. The four immediately decided to go back to Fr. Fernandez and told the priest what Ricardo Ramirez found inside the cave, and what they were planning to do. When the priest saw the estampita, he told the group that it was the picture of Our Lady of Guadalupe. He asked for it and kept it. He gave his consent for the construction of a small chapel in honor of Our Lady of Guadalupe in kalunasan, and agreed to lend them the two-foot wooden image they saw in the convent on their yearly novena and fiesta from December 4 to 12. However, he also made them promise that the image should be returned to San Nicolas after the fiesta. According to the narration of Florencio "Noy Rencio" Tabal, who was already 96 years old when I talked to him sometime in 2002, the parishioners from Pasil resented the lending of the image to the Banawan chapel for the first fiesta celebration, and they would always try to prevent the procession from leaving San Nicolas by blocking the path but the people of Banawan, more numerous in number than them, persisted and always succeeded in bringing the image to the chapel in the mountain. During this time, the name of the barrio became Guadalupe because word got around that the Blessed Virgin of Guadalupe appeared in a cave in Banawan.

Although there was a story of a sighting by the late Josefa "Nang Sepa" Labra (d. 1948) of a young and beautiful girl who would play in what is now the church plaza which at that time was still full of fruit trees. According to Nang Seap, she would often check on her carrabaos tied in the trees along the plaza at dawn. Often, she would be disturbed by the sight of a young girl playing at dawn. So one day, she decided to spy on the girl, Nang Sepa wend inside the chapel to validate her suspicion that the girl could be no other that the Virgin of Guadalupe. She checked the image and saw amorseco weeds attached to the hemline of its dress, the kind that abounds in the plaza. In addition, the fragrance that accompanies the presence of the young girl when she shows herself to Nang Sepa at dawn also filled the chapel. From then on, word spread that the Blessed Virgin appears as a chubby little girl and plays around the plaza of the chapel at dawn.

From that first Fiesta in 1889 until 1901, Our lady of Guadalupe was just a local barrio devotion. Every year, the image was borrowe









japanese floor pillows








japanese floor pillows




J-Life Authentic Traditional Japanese Zabuton Floor Cushion - Tombo (Dragonfly) Teal - 21" x 22"






Our Authentic Traditional Japanese Zabuton Floor Cushion will provide many years of use and enjoyment. Our zabuton is filled with three inches of cotton batting and spun polyester. The filling is packed densely enough to provide support and is soft enough to provide years of comfort. The beautiful Japanese outer cover is made of a sturdy, 100% cotton fabric. One side of the cover features a zipper so it can be easily removed and washed. Inside the cover, the batting is enclosed in a muslin casing. Each zabuton is 21'' long by 22'' wide by 3'' tall. Zabutons are rectangular cushions traditionally used in Japan for sitting but also used to assist you in your yoga sitting practice. All our pillows are hand made by skilled craftsmen and designed to last for many years. This will quickly become your favorite pillow.










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